The LumaVox small business marketing blog category contains articles about small business marketing.

6 12, 2018

Using Drone Video in Small Business Marketing

By |2018-12-06T18:28:18+00:00December 6th, 2018|Blog, Small Business Marketing, Video Marketing, Video Production|0 Comments

Using Drone Video in Small Business Marketing

DJI Inspire Drone

Drone Video Adds Another Level to Small Business Marketing

The use of video as part of a small business marketing strategy continues to grow by leaps and bounds. An astounding 54% of customers want to see more video content from businesses. Savvy small business marketers are working hard to meet that growing demand. More and more they’re finding that using drone video in small business marketing improves that new content.

With the increased video content available to consumers comes the challenge of how to make that video content engaging. A video isn’t worth much if a viewer doesn’t want to watch it. As a small business marketer your job is to tell the story of your business or your client’s business and spread their message. It doesn’t help tell that story or spread that message if the viewers click away early in the viewing. At least it doesn’t help much.

The latest trend to help with that viewer engagement is drone videography. Aerial footage is a powerful tool that businesses can use to help increase viewer engagement. Drone videography can add an elegance and bring a fresh perspective to video content.

Drone Technology

The days of needing to book time in a helicopter in order to get good aerial footage are long gone. Helicopters are fun. They’re also very expensive to operate.

Today’s drone technology offers videographers high quality and sophisticated platforms to capture aerial footage and create videos that are engaging. The technology is amazing, and the footage drones capture can be stunning.

Drones come in all shapes and sizes.

Phantom 3SE Drone

Drones used in commercial videography for small business marketing usually:

  • Have four or more rotors that provide lift
  • Weigh less than 55 pounds.
  • Are flown by one Pilot in Command who also operates the video camera
  • Have a camera that can record High Definition video for use in online marketing
  • Transmits an aerial view in real time to the Pilot in Command while flying

Types of Businesses That Stand out From the Crowd by Using Drones

Any business can use drone aerial footage to help reach potential customers. The possibilities are almost endless and range from aerial footage of properties to highly choreographed sequences woven into a film narrative.

Some businesses particularly benefit from the unmanned aerial technology, including:

  • Real estate agents
  • Hotels and resorts
  • Sporting venues such as golf courses
  • Weddings and family events
  • Residential and industrial contractors

In fact, real estate is the second largest industry in the United States that uses drone technology to reach potential clients. I’m sure you can understand why. Beautifully filmed aerial shots of a property adds that extra movement and punch that helps keep viewers engaged.

One thing to avoid is to seem like you’re doing drone marketing. You should have the aerial footage add to your video and to your messaging but not be about the aerial footage. You’ve probably seen drone videos that go on and on for minutes on end. The video usually gets boring pretty quickly. Instead, use the video footage to just add a little extra movement and perspective here and there. Focus on the story you’re telling in your video, and not on the techniques you used to tell your story. That way your audience will be more likely to engage longer with your content.

Certification Required for Commercial Drone Flying

Operating a drone for any type of commercial use in the United States requires certification by the FAA, the Federal Aviation Administration. The FAA is the same agency that regulates the commercial airline industry. Any use in which you trade money, goods, or services in exchange for drone operation, is commercial use. That includes if you’re filming aerial footage yourself and using it in your marketing. For example, if you’re a real estate agent using a drone to help with property listings you will need FAA certification.

So for example if you operate a golf course and you trade some rounds of golf with someone who films drone footage, you are engaging in a commercial drone operation. In that case, the person needs to have FAA certification to operate the drone.

In addition to FAA certification for commercial drone operation within US airspace, insurance underwriters also require the FAA certification. Drone technology is very safe, however things can go wrong. Drones can weigh up to 55 pounds according to FAA regulations. Should something go wrong, an object of that size can cause serious property damage, personal injury, or even death. Obviously in such cases, the liability issues can be significant.

An FAA Part 107, Remote Pilot Small Unmanned Aircraft System, is the certification required for commercial drone operation in the United States.

Certification

Be sure the videographer you hire has this FAA certification. Or obtain one yourself if you’re going to be filming your own aerial footage for commercial use.

Keep Your Video Marketing Fresh

You probably know the statistic. Viewers click away from more than 80% of videos in less than 20 seconds. No matter how long the video is.

Technology keeps moving at a rapid pace. Customers and clients, or potential customers and clients, expect businesses to keep up with the changes in technology. That includes changes in content they consume.

To keep them engaged you need to keep your videos fresh. Aerial footage using drones can help you do that.
Used in the right way, drone videography adds that extra sparkle that viewers love.

Featured photo courtesy of Mitch Nielson.

14 03, 2018

Small Business and Marketing Courses

By |2018-07-19T08:47:10+00:00March 14th, 2018|Blog, Small Business Marketing|0 Comments

Small Business and Marketing Courses

Small Business and Marketing Courses

There’s a growing number of sources offering online small business and marketing courses. As a result it’s becoming easier to learn the strategies a small business needs to successfully market in the new reality. With this in mind, I’ve listed five here, including two that I’ve taken myself and three that come recommended.

The Udemy Online Learning Platform

Udemy is an online learning platform aimed at professional adults.  They have nearly two thousand courses in marketing including courses in marketing strategy and email marketing.

I’ve taken the course there taught by Seth Godin, a guru in the field of marketing in the internet age. If you’re a freelancer, Seth’s course for freelancers and how to market freelance work is excellent. I recommend it. Seth also offers courses titled “Presenting to Persuade” and “Value Creation Master Class”.

Lynda.com Courses Using Video

Lynda.com was one of the first sites that used video to teach courses. The original courses taught how to use editing programs for photography and video such as Photoshop, Final Cut Pro, and Adobe Premiere.

The company was started in the mid 1995 by a woman actually named Lynda. In 2015 Lynda Weinman and her husband sold lynda.com to LinkedIn for 1.5 Billion dollars!

Since they started offering online video courses in 2002, Lynda.com has been the go to site for photographers and videographers looking for courses on software and on techniques for photography and video.

Lynda.com has now expanded their selection to include small business and marketing courses.

Hubspot for Inbound Marketing and Sales

There are a number of good Customer Relationship Management platforms available today. A CRM is needed for managing email marketing campaigns as well as social media and advertising campaigns.
Some good CRMs include:

Here at LumaVox we’ve used both Insightly and Base in the past. Now we’re using HubSpot to both manage our client relationships and grow our business.

HubSpot hosts a learning academy at their site with small business and marketing courses. I earned certification at the HubSpot Academy for the methodology of inbound marketing and can highly recommend them.

Copyblogger Content Creation Course

Copyblogger was recommended to me as a site for learning content creation. For instance, they offer courses and information about copywriting for blogging as well as information about podcasting.

Google Marketing Course

Google continuously changes their search algorithm. Therefore, it’s necessary to stay on top of the best practices for ranking in Google. Certainly Google rank still matters, even with the changes taking place that affect search results such as your location and search history.

Of course the most direct and measurable marketing on Google continues to be with paid ads using Adwords. In fact, an Adwords campaign gives you the numbers to measure your ROI. Generally speaking, the more sophisticated you are at running an Adwords campaign, the lower the cost of converting a lead.

Google offers an Adwords Certification course. Best of all it’s free!

Get Started With Small Business and Marketing Courses

The old adage about seminars and courses is true; if you learn just one new thing it’s worth the time and effort. So decide on one thing that you need to improve on in marketing your business and then find an online course to help you get up to speed with skills to execute that change.

The featured photo is by Alejandro Escamilla.

19 02, 2018

Online Marketing for Local Small Business

By |2018-07-19T08:48:22+00:00February 19th, 2018|Blog, Small Business Marketing|0 Comments

Online Marketing for Local Small Business

local-business-marketing

You know the old ways of marketing for small business such as print, TV, and radio don’t work as well as they use to. We’re in the digital age now. So what do you do to take advantage of the opportunities in online marketing? Here are posts from two resources with information on online marketing for local small business.

Does Google Rank Still Matter?

Google continues to change its search engine algorithm, and as Google goes so goes the rest of the industry. Matthew Barby at HubSpot suggests that overall keyword ranking won’t be as important going forward. Instead, searches will show results based on previous search history, as well as being device specific and geo targeted.

“Ultimately, Google will deliver results that are personalized to a user based on their search history. This means that if I were to search for a query like “electric cars” and I’d previously been browsing the Tesla website, it’s a possibility that Google would tailor the rankings of the search results to show Tesla near the top.” — Matthew Barby

Help With Online Reviews

The folks at Small Business Trends have advice on how to earn more online reviews.
They include:

So keep focusing on creating content with keywords and keyword phrases, but realize that as we move forward Google will consider these keywords within the context of the searchers history, device, and location.

Manage your reviews. You know the pluses and minuses of reviews. In the long run, it’s important to stay on top of them.

Featured Photo by Ian Baldwin on Unsplash